How to Research your
Southern Foster Family

Missouri: 1830, 1840 & 1850 Census

Click here first
to see the overall growth of the Foster Families as they spread out with the
expansion of the United States during this sixty year time period.  See how all Northern and
Southern Foster Families expanded to the states around them as the country moved west!

 

In 1805 Missouri became part of the Territory of Louisiana and remained so until 1812 when it became a territory in its own name.  At that time it claimed a population of 20,000.  Most of its early settlers came from Kentucky and Virginia, and some from North and South Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.  In those early days, Indian tribes, enticed by the British, constantly scourged the Missouri settlers in severe plundering raids.  It was not until about 1815 that these raids were halted through peace treaties with the various Indian tribes within the territory.

Missouri became a state in 1821.  Then it had about 56,000 white settlers.  She became the twenty-fourth state in the Union.

For many decades after 1830 a steady stream of European immigrants came into the state, as a result of which St. Louis has a distinct German flavor.  Many Irish, English, Polish, Swiss, Bohemian and Italian natives settled in various parts of the state.

1830 Census - (28) Foster Head of Households.  Enumerators of the 1830 census were asked to include the following categories in the census: name of head of household; number of free white males and females in age categories: 0 to 5, 5 to 10, 10 to 15, 15 to 20, 20 to 30, 30 to 40, 40 to 50, 50 to 60, 60 to 70, 70 to 80, 80 to 90, 90 to 100, over 100; the name of a slave owner and the number of slaves owned by that person; the number of male and female slaves and free "colored" persons by age categories; the number of foreigners (not naturalized) in a household; the number of deaf, dumb, and blind persons within a household; and town or district, and county of residence. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.

1840 Census - (187) Foster Head of Households.  Enumerators of the 1840 census were asked to include the following categories in the census: name of head of household; number of free white males and females in age categories: 0 to 5, 5 to 10, 10 to 15, 15 to 20, 20 to 30, 30 to 40, 40 to 50, 50 to 60, 60 to 70, 70 to 80, 80 to 90, 90 to 100, over 100; the name of a slave owner and the number of slaves owned by that person; the number of male and female slaves and free "colored" persons by age categories; the number of foreigners (not naturalized) in a household; the number of deaf, dumb, and blind persons within a household; and town or district, and county of residence.

Additionally, the 1840 census, asked for the first time, the ages of revolutionary war pensioners and the number of individuals engaged in mining, agriculture, commerce, manufacturing and trade, navigation of the ocean, navigation of canals, lakes and rivers, learned professions and engineers; number in school, number in family over age twenty-one who could not read and write, and the number of insane. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.

1850 Census - (789) Foster Head of Households.  For the first time in the history of the United States census, enumerators of the 1850 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age as of the census day; sex; color; birthplace; occupation of males over age fifteen; value of real estate; whether married within the previous year; whether deaf-mute, blind, insane, or "idiotic"; whether able to read or write for individuals over age twenty; and whether the person attended school within the previous year. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.


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